Focaccia Bread

This homemade recipe for EASY No Knead Focaccia Bread is surprisingly simple but makes rich, flavorful, and soft bread with ultra crispy edges that you're going to love!

Yield: 10 servings

Prep Time: 30 minutes

Cook: 30 minutes

This homemade recipe for EASY No Knead Focaccia Bread is surprisingly simple but makes rich, flavorful, and soft bread with ultra crispy edges that you're going to love!

Tessa's Recipe Rundown...

Taste: Is there anything better than a good extra-virgin olive oil with fresh rosemary, especially when embedded in bread?! The salt on top of this bread doesn’t hurt either.
Texture: The best part of focaccia is the texture, am I right? It’s somehow magically chewy yet soft rich and just slightly crunchy and crusty at the edges. It’s perfection in every bite.
Ease: This is a super simple recipe, just requires some patience.
Appearance: How could you ever resist a bite?
Pros: Just amazing all-around.
Cons: Rich and slightly indulgent.
Would I make this again? Absolutely.

I love baking bread and lately I’ve gotten so many messages from you guys saying you love seeing bread baking-related recipes, tips, tutorials, and videos. That makes me SO happy. The idea of making homemade bread can be daunting and can also sometimes feels like something only done in decades past. How many of you have grandmothers who only baked bread from scratch?

Tray of focaccia dough ready for the oven

I am thrilled about the more recent trend towards scratch-made cooking and baking and an increased importance placed on quality ingredients and food. That is what I am ALL about! Bread baking gets a bad rap because in reality, all it requires is patience. I promise it’s not as scary as it sometimes seems.

Back in 2014 was when I first published this Focaccia Bread recipe. More recently I binge-watched Salt Fat Acid Head on Netflix and LOVED it.

Tray of homemade rosemary focaccia bread fresh from the oven

Samin Nosrat has such a pure and joyful love and curiosity for food and culture that’s positively contagious. In the “Fat” episode she makes a batch of Ligurian Focaccia and it looks so perfect and incredible that I knew I needed to make a batch myself, STAT.

So I took my original focaccia recipe from years ago and added elements to it inspired by Diego and Samin in the show. I reduced the amount of yeast and added a longer rising / fermentation time to develop a better flavor and texture. It’s totally worth the wait. Not only that, but in doing so I was able to switch this to a ‘no knead’ method recipe so you don’t even need a stand mixer!

Then I added a salty brine on top just before baking to give the focaccia that crispy salty crust that’s so mouthwatering and addictive.

Up close shot of focaccia bread crust

Looking at this recipe you might think there’s too much salt but I promise, there’s not. Just be sure to use the type of salt called for. It might also seem like there’s a lot of olive oil but truly that’s where all of the magical flavor and texture comes from in any focaccia recipe.

To guarantee crispy golden brown edges, I like to use a pizza stone to bake the tray of focaccia dough on. If you don’t have one, simply invert a quality rimmed baking tray and use in place of a stone.

I had to add fresh herbs to my recipe because Rosemary Focaccia Bread is my favorite. Eating it straight up with nothing else is one of life’s simplest pleasures. But it also makes for a stellar sandwich.

Feel free to add in whatever herbs you like to the bread. You can also top the bread with whatever you fancy. I also like shredded cheese, tomatoes, or even caramelized onions! You could also add garlic to the dough if you please. I also have a delectable Focaccia Pizza recipe here you might want to try.

Up close of the inside texture of focaccia bread cut open

How to Make Focaccia Ahead of Time

You can make it ahead of time by letting the dough hang out in the fridge, covered, for a few days before shaping. The longer it ferments the more flavor will develop. Allow to come to room temperature before shaping and allowing to rise for the second time.

How to Serve & Store Focaccia Bread

The focaccia is definitely best served the day it’s made. However, you can freeze any leftover focaccia. Wrap it tightly in plastic wrap, then in foil. Keep in the the freezer for about a month. Allow to defrost at room temperature then refresh in a 325°F oven until warmed through and crispy again, about 5 minutes. Day old bread can also be chopped up, baked at 375°F for about 10 minutes, and used as croutons!

More Homemade Bread Recipes

How to make
Focaccia Bread

Yield: 10 servings
Prep Time: 30 minutes
Cook Time: 30 minutes
Inactive Time 11 hours
Total Time: 11 hours 56 minutes
This homemade recipe for EASY No Knead Focaccia Bread is surprisingly simple but makes rich, flavorful, and soft bread with ultra crispy edges that you're going to love!

Ingredients

For the dough:

  • 2 cups lukewarm water
  • 1 teaspoon active dry yeast
  • 1 tablespoon granulated sugar
  • 5 sprigs fresh rosemary leaves, chopped and divided
  • 5 1/4 cups (670 grams) all-purpose flour, plus more for kneading
  • 1 tablespoon kosher salt, plus coarse sea salt for sprinkling
  • 1 cup extra-virgin olive oil, divided

For the brine:

  • 3/4 teaspoon fine sea salt
  • 1/3 cup lukewarm water

Directions

  1. In a large bowl combine the water, yeast, and sugar. Add in 2 teaspoons of the chopped rosemary, half the flour, and the salt, stirring to combine. Add 1/2 cup olive oil. Gradually add in the remaining flour until a shaggy mass forms. Only add in as much flour as you need to create a shaggy slightly sticky dough.

  2. Transfer the dough to a lightly oiled bowl. Cover with plastic wrap and let ferment at room temperature for about 8 to 10 hours, or until doubled in size. At this point you can refrigerate the dough for several days until ready to bake. This will also develop more flavor.
  3. Coat a rimmed half sheet pan with the remaining 1/2 cup olive oil. Turn the dough onto the pan and begin pressing it out with your fingertips to fit the size of the pan. Coax and stretch the dough to fit the entire pan, or just about. If the dough springs back, cover and let it rest for 10 minutes before proceeding. Spread your fingers to make little dimples all the way through the dough. 

Make the brine:

  1. Combine the warm water and salt together until the salt is dissolved. Pour all over the dough to make little pools of water in the dimples. Cover loosely with plastic and allow to rise again until the dough is puffy, about 45 minutes.

Bake the bread:

  1. Meanwhile, place a baking stone in the oven and preheat to 450°F. If you don't have a baking stone, invert a heavy duty rimmed baking sheet and place in the oven to preheat.

  2. Sprinkle the dough liberally with coarse sea salt and the remaining rosemary leaves. Bake with the sheet pan on top of stone until the focaccia is golden brown, 25 to 30 minutes.

Course: Side Dish
Cuisine: Italian
Keyword: homemade

This recipe was originally published in 2014 and recently updated with recipe improvements and new photos. Photos by Ashley McLaughlin.

About Tessa...

I share trusted baking recipes your friends will LOVE alongside insights into the science of sweets. I'm a professionally trained chef, cookbook author, and cookie queen. I love to write about all things sweet, carb-y, and homemade. I live in Phoenix, Arizona (hence the blog name!)

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  1. #
    Paul Scivetti — August 13, 2014 at 4:39 am

    Hi, Tessa,

    Nothing makes your house smell more like home than bread in the oven! Your focaccia looks delicious – I can almost smell it baking now. 🙂

    A couple of baking notes….

    1. You should really, really, really consider weighing ALL the ingredients. Besides making ‘baker’s math’ calculations easier, it turns out that inaccurate measurements are a very common problem (especially few new bakers) and, in my opinion, are the single biggest reason people get ‘turned off’ to baking.

    2. Salt. Building on point #1, salt, especially kosher salt, needs to be weighed. The density of kosher salt varies wildly by brand. i.e. Morton kosher salt is about twice as dence as Diamond Crystal kosher salt, meaning the amount of salt in a volume-based measurement (like a tablespoon) can be way, way, way off depending on the brand of salt you’re using. Weighing gets rid of this problem completely.

    3. Freezing dough. If you’re going to freeze pizza or focaccia dough you want to let it go through the 1st rise (primary fermentation) first before freezing to let the dough develop. The extreme cold of the freezer really annoys the yeast and shuts them down quickly. Going directly into the freezer will result in an under-developed dough which won’t taste or bake the way it should.

    4. Bread machine. If you use your bread machine as a ‘dough machine’, you don’t need a lot of adaptation…just mix the dough in the bread machine and then pick up where you move the dough to an oiled bowl. Focaccia is a flat bread by definition – part of its appeal is the high crust to crumb ratio – so you should not bake focaccia in a bread machine ever.

    BTW – I love your writing style – very clear, easy to follow and you always add an element of fun into each recipe. Always a delight to read your work!

    Happy baking!

  2. #
    Phi @ The Sweetphi Blog — August 13, 2014 at 6:17 am

    Wow-this looks truly delicious! I’ve been dying for some good focaccia bread and just so happen to have all the ingredients so I’m going to give this a try this week! And the photos beautiful as usual!

  3. #
    sally @ sallys baking addiction — August 13, 2014 at 6:40 am

    Tessa, thank you so much for posting this wonderful focaccia recipe! And all of your instructions and step-by-step photos are so helpful. I love focaccia and have to try it at home now.

  4. #
    Gaby — August 13, 2014 at 7:58 am

    I love focaccia and can’t wait to try this out!

  5. #
    Anna @ Crunchy Creamy Sweet — August 13, 2014 at 9:00 am

    Focaccia is my favorite! Looks gorgeous, Tessa!

  6. #
    Susan — August 13, 2014 at 1:51 pm

    I’m new to your blog and I love that the first post I received is for focaccia. I’m also delighted to know that you don’t own a bread machine. Baking bread from scratch is really not difficult, though mastering the technique of hand-kneading has a bit of a learning curve (I don’t have a stand mixer, either). Homemade bread is the best.

    • #
      Tessa — August 13, 2014 at 10:08 pm

      Thanks so much! Glad to have a fellow homemade bread lover around 🙂

  7. #
    Nicole ~ Cooking for Keeps — August 13, 2014 at 2:31 pm

    Looks like it came from the store! Gorgeous!

  8. #
    Jessica — August 17, 2014 at 7:19 am

    I tried to save this recipe to my Ziplist and it’s not working. I keep getting a message that the content isn’t there. Can this be fixed?

    • #
      Tessa — August 17, 2014 at 9:01 am

      Thanks for bringing this to my attention Jessica. It appears something is very wrong with this post, there are now multiple issues that I have found. I am working on resolving these issues and will let you know when they are fixed. Sorry for the inconvenience!

    • #
      Tessa — August 17, 2014 at 9:21 am

      Jessica, can you try again now? If it still isn’t working try restarting your browser.

  9. #
    Jessica — August 17, 2014 at 10:06 am

    Got it this time! Thanks for fixining it.

    • #
      Tessa — August 17, 2014 at 4:14 pm

      Awesome! You’re so welcome.

  10. #
    Sarah @ Seriously Lovely — August 19, 2014 at 7:21 am

    Oh my goodness, that looks soooooo good!

  11. #
    Met — September 18, 2014 at 10:31 am

    Hi Tessa,

    How would the first few steps be adapted for someone who doesn’t have a standing mixer?

    Thanks,

    Metta

    • #
      Tessa — September 19, 2014 at 1:30 pm

      Hi Metta – as I mentioned in the video you can knead the dough by hand, it’ll just take some strength and maybe a bit more time.

  12. #
    LaVerne McAfee — October 13, 2014 at 12:52 pm

    Hi Tessa,
    Have quite a few of your recipes printed and planning on making today. A little coffee shop where I used to live made Focaccia Buns that were so awesome! While I don’t usually like olives I loved the few that were in the bun. I saw Frenchie (the cook) bring them out of the oven once and brushed them with (lots) of butter. Any idea on how to make them?

    • #
      Tessa — October 15, 2014 at 3:44 pm

      Ooh Focaccia Buns sound lovely! I might have to look into developing a recipe 🙂

  13. #
    Michelle Hardin — November 18, 2014 at 8:59 am

    Absoltely LOVE this recipe 🙂 have made this twice already 🙂 Your link for what jelly roll pan you use isn’t working & was wondering if you could tell me what size you use? I think its time to invest in one 🙂 Thank you!!

  14. #
    Anna Rollins — February 8, 2015 at 6:24 pm

    I love this recipe!!!
    it is crunch but soft. it is delicious, and makes me smile so big when i bite into it. we made it for thanksgiving, for potlucks, for a dinner party and just for having around. I am so in love. thank you for this AMAZING fresh focaccia 🙂 THANK YOU!

  15. #
    Angiengs — March 6, 2015 at 12:20 am

    I was lead to your blog from Pinterest. Your Focaccia looks so gorgeous, will definately try to bake this soon.

  16. #
    Sechat — March 15, 2015 at 3:54 pm

    Just made your recipe. So delicious, that it has taken the #2 spot behind my challah bread. Thank you.

  17. #
    Jaci — March 25, 2015 at 2:11 pm

    So easy to make and I kneaded my bread by hand because I dont have a stand mixer and still came out perfect!

  18. #
    Jeff j — March 27, 2015 at 9:53 pm

    Killer! First time making; added a couple more herbs and super coarse salt on top. I wanted to make sandwhiches out of this-but I spread it too much, and only rose 1.5 inches or less. Which I now realize was supposed to happen. I only ate the bread for dinner and was not dissapointed. Comparing against William Sonomas recipe…the only thing I changed, dbled the yeast and allowed to rest in the water for 5 mins (whisked first) Added oil in before flour and only spread out 3/4 of pan-boom perfect for sandwhiches! Thank you so much! Super easy, cheap and delicious!

  19. #
    Mayada — April 3, 2015 at 6:47 am

    can someone use bread flour instead of all purpose flour if they have it on hand?

  20. #
    Ginger — April 27, 2015 at 8:01 am

    I am also curious if bread flour can be used in place of all purpose flour.

    • #
      Tessa — April 27, 2015 at 9:25 pm

      I haven’t tried that so I’m not sure.

  21. #
    Eva — April 27, 2015 at 8:38 am

    Was wondering if you could use gluten free flour, and if so, would I alter recipe at all? I’ve used it for cookies and brownies and is same a regular flour. Thank you!

    • #
      Tessa — April 27, 2015 at 9:24 pm

      I’m not sure GF flour would work. Unlike cookies and brownies, bread wholly relies on the gluten formation for its structure and shape (hence the kneading) so you might try to find a specifically GF focaccia bread recipe.

  22. #
    margaret — May 1, 2015 at 9:44 pm

    When I saw your rosemary foccacia receipe it looked so good i couldn”t wait to try it. I have had two attempts trying to make it, But were not succesful it didn”t come stretchy like yours. But when I saw your step by step video I was more inspired to make it. And it was perfect and so delicious it made the house and the smell outside smelt like a real bakery.The only thing I changed was the all purpose flour to bread flour as I didn’t know there was any difference. And I was a bit scepticle about adding the yeast with the ingredients, but it worked. Much easier. thank you so much.

  23. #
    [email protected] — July 8, 2015 at 4:12 pm

    I’m baking this right now, it’s in the oven! I put half in freezer!

  24. #
    Jacqueline — July 16, 2015 at 3:45 am

    I made this bread yesterday to have with a pasta dinner. It was so easy and delicious! I have my friends and family asking me to make it for them now. Thank you for posting the recipe with the video! I will make this bread on a regular basis now.

  25. #
    Emily — August 11, 2015 at 11:43 am

    AMAZING! I made this today and it smelled heavenly while baking and tasted even better. So simple and delicious. I cannot stop eating it!!!

    • #
      Tessa — August 11, 2015 at 2:50 pm

      Wonderful Emily! So happy to hear it 🙂

  26. #
    Fran — December 16, 2015 at 6:00 am

    This looks amazing. I wonder if it would work with wholemeal flour?

  27. #
    Jo-Ann Jewett — January 8, 2016 at 8:11 pm

    Where is the recipe? I signed up do I could get it.?

  28. #
    Ans — January 9, 2016 at 9:02 pm

    Hi,

    Love all your recipes and especially the videos that come along with the step by step guide. I would really appreciate if you could do pita bread recipe video.

    TIA!

  29. #
    April — January 17, 2016 at 4:18 pm

    Hey, wanted to make focaccia with dinner tonight and was shuffled here via Pinterest. Super easy recipe, I didn’t add the rosemary, but on the second rise I added some caramelized onions and garlic to the top, put coarse salt and pepper, topped it all with asiago cheese. I wish I could submit a photo! Thanks for the recipe!

    • #
      Tessa — January 20, 2016 at 10:42 am

      Wonderful! Love your spin on the recipe. If you’re on Instagram use #handletheheat and I’ll see your photo!

  30. #
    Cody — January 26, 2016 at 7:11 am

    I’m new to bread making so forgive me if this is a dumb question. Would I be able to use Whole Wheat Flour rather than All-Purpose? Perhaps a combination of the two? I just don’t have enough of the All-Purpose at the moment and wanted to avoid having to go to the store if possible. ?
    Thank you!

    • #
      Tessa — January 26, 2016 at 11:42 am

      I don’t think the results would be quite as good. It would make the Focaccia denser with a more pronounced wheat flavor. If that’s okay with you – give it a try. If not, it might be worth the effort to run to the store to make a really awesome bread. Happy baking!

  31. #
    Laci — February 13, 2016 at 4:41 pm

    I loved this! It was so yummy!

  32. #
    Micharl — February 14, 2016 at 12:11 pm

    Just put it the oven will let you know how it comes out….can’t wait!!!

  33. #
    Denise — March 21, 2016 at 7:29 am

    I have made this bread twice in the last week since discovering your recipe. It is delicious. The second time I used thyme instead of rosemary and sprinkled shredded parmesan on top before baking. Either way it was so good! We end up giving so much away because we want to share it. So far we have had it with pasta and chili. We have toasted it. We have made sandwiches with it. I have had so many requests for the recipe and have guided my friends to your site and your wonderful video. Thank you so much for sharing!

  34. #
    Jamie — April 5, 2016 at 10:39 am

    This looks amazing! Question for you though…I am wanting to make foccacia to slice in half and eat sandwiches on. Does this get thick enough for that? I need to make it for a large group and don’t want a bunch of foccacia that is too thin to make a sandwich on!

  35. #
    Denise — April 16, 2016 at 6:52 am

    Hi Jamie, I made my bread in a regular jelly roll pan (bottom measures 10″ by 15″). The bread sliced wonderfully for a nice sandwich.

  36. #
    Stephie Clark — June 1, 2016 at 8:13 am

    Hi is all purpose flour what we call plain flour in the uk?
    Thanks

    • #
      Tessa — June 1, 2016 at 11:08 am

      Yes, should be the same.

  37. #
    Lily — July 2, 2016 at 6:30 pm

    I just tried this recipe . it was awesome. the best !!!! I put the oil on a baking pan then preheat the oven together with the pan . After spread the dough and bake. I saw some bakery did it like this and it turns out super good and crispy! try it!!!

    • #
      Tessa — July 3, 2016 at 8:41 pm

      Great tip, Lily!! xo

  38. #
    Shi — July 24, 2016 at 11:02 am

    Hi Tessa! Wd I b able to half the recipe or it wdnt work?

  39. #
    Kawal — August 16, 2016 at 9:25 am

    I love this receipe! Thank you so much for the great directions and photos. I have made this a many times and it ALWAYS turns out perfect.

    • #
      Tessa — August 17, 2016 at 10:44 am

      So happy to hear that!!

  40. #
    Sandee — October 5, 2016 at 1:38 pm

    Oh my gosh, my Italian Bakery is closing after 107 years. I have purchased their focaccia bread for as long as I remember. I’ve been looking for a great recipe to try and make my own at home. After looking at your site, I believe I found just what I was looking for. The only difference is, I will be making mine with mushrooms and sausage on the top. Also, another one with pepperoni and cheese.
    Thank you so much for the recipe and I will let you know if mine is at least close to the bakeries focassia.

    • #
      Tessa — October 10, 2016 at 10:39 am

      Awww, how sad! I hope this recipe can be a good replacement!

  41. #
    Andrea — December 14, 2016 at 11:40 am

    A. Maze. ING. !
    Made it 2x and have several requests from friends for more. Definitely going to make a few for the holidays

  42. #
    JoeSt — March 6, 2017 at 7:20 pm

    Hey, Could you please tell me the amounts of the recipee on grams and mls because i am not sure which cup size to use.
    Thank you very much!

  43. #
    Cheyenne — May 20, 2017 at 8:20 pm

    Hi Tessa, I am planning on making this recipe soon and realized I don’t have a jelly roll pan. I think it’s probably time to invest in one if I will be making this focaccia bread as much I think I will be.hehe 😉 Your link to your jelly roll pan is not working and I was wondering what size yours is? Thank you! Beautiful site and recipes!

  44. #
    Rescott — June 3, 2017 at 12:14 pm

    The dough was not sticky because % 1/4 flour is toooooooo much!

  45. #
    Jane — August 16, 2017 at 12:57 pm

    It looks delicious, Can I use Sourdough starter instead of instant yeast, if so how much should I use for 670g flour? tks

  46. #
    marcia mccarver — November 17, 2017 at 11:29 am

    I tried this yesterday and it was delicious. I have always made my bread in a 9×13 pan as I like it thicker and not so much crust. it worked out perfectly/ /I was a baker for 25 years and when I retired I missed having a proof box to raise my breads in so I came up with an alternative, I wash a load of dishes in my dishwasher leaving the top shelf empty. As soon as the drying cycle starts I pull out top shelf , load my pans of bread and quickly shut door. the moist warm heat raises bread quickly and works as well as my proof box in the bakery. Try it, you will love it, just be sure it is on drying cycle and not just in between wash and rinse or you will end up with a pot or water in your bread pan, enjoy!

  47. #
    Rita Zelig — September 20, 2018 at 11:21 am

    First of all…let me salary, THIS IS THE BEST FOCACCIA RECIPE EVER! Second, having made it…I tried a bit of an experiment. I used the correct amount of flour, but divided the flour making half of it BREAD FLOUR, the other half, using regular flour. It not only worked out fine…it is delicate, fluffy, crunchy yumminess! I also infused the olive oil with garlic, rosemary & cracked black pepper, then added onions to the top…along with some toasted garlic. Yes! I said “Toasted Garlic”! It comes pre-prepared in a jar & lots of Jewish bakers use it to make their Sabbath Challah Breads with. It lends itself quite well to this recipe. If I could have submitted a pic to go with this comment, I would have! Tessa, you are the most amazing chef & top baker EVER! Thank you once again for your amazingly easy, yet spectacularly mouthwatering recipes!❤️

  48. #
    Holly — November 21, 2018 at 6:10 pm

    This looks wonderful! I’m new at this, so I have a stupid question. I plan to make it the night before, do I need to let it rise for an hour before putting in the plastic bag?

  49. #
    Bruce Homis — March 7, 2019 at 4:35 pm

    We used your focaccia dough recipe the other day. We made the dough in the early afternoon and let it rise until late at night. We then transferred the dough into a pan where we let it rise for 2 hours and then refrigerated it overnight. We took the pan out in the early afternoon and let it rise for another 2 hours and then applied toppings. We let it bake for 50 minutes and I can’t describe how delicious it was and how it reminded me of what my mom used to make when I was much younger. Thank you for sharing.

  50. #
    Suzanne — May 22, 2019 at 11:21 am

    Uh oh. The recipe has changed and I didn’t save the original. I’ve been making this for a few years and it’s a favorite. I haven’t tried the updated version yet and I’m slightly afraid to as the original was so highly received.

  51. #
    Jagruti — July 11, 2019 at 5:07 am

    i can’t thank you enough for this recipe. It turned out superb. Best foccacia bread I’ve made. Once again thanks.

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